A Video About Speeding in Church’s Neighborhood

Welcome to the Diocese of Mid-America
23/04/2017
Around the Parish, April 26, 2017
11/05/2017

A Video About Speeding in Church’s Neighborhood

Neighbors work to find the answer to stop speeders

TULSA, Okla. (KTUL) — It is probably impossible to stop the millions of people who speed every day, but there are ways to deter it.

Brian Parker has a front row seat to all of the speeders in Brady Heights along north Denver. He was tired of the problems they were causing and decided to put together a 96-page case study and present it to the City of Tulsa.

 It is probably impossible to stop the millions of people who speed every day, but there are ways to deter it (KTUL).
TULSA, Okla. (KTUL) — It is probably impossible to stop the millions of people who speed every day, but there are ways to deter it.

Brian Parker has a front row seat to all of the speeders in Brady Heights along north Denver. He was tired of the problems they were causing and decided to put together a 96-page case study and present it to the City of Tulsa.

“When people hit parked cars, that is a problem,” Parker said. “When people hit pedestrians, that is even more of a problem.”

Both of which have happened many times.

Signs that say, “Drive like your kids live here,” sit sporadically throughout the neighborhood, hoping to get the attention of speeders.

“Sometimes you can see people going past here probably more than 50,” Rusty Mills said.

“It seems to me people are going 40 or 50 miles an hour easily,” Tiffany Hurley said.

Hurley has had two of her cars totaled by people driving too fast on the road.

Mills and his wife have lived in the neighborhood for a year with their three-year-old son.

The fact that people are roaring down their street is frightening.

“You really have to watch them because if they get close to the street, your heart pounds a little bit and you yell at them to get back because it is dangerous,” Mills said.

The first weekend the family of three moved in, their dog was hit and killed by a speeding driver.

“She died in my lap,” Mills said.

That dog was their son’s best friend and a part of their family.

“Slow down,” Mills said.

The answer seems easy, put out some stop signs and lower the current speed limit from 30 miles per hour to 20 or 25. But nothing is ever that simple.

“The city can put any number up on the speed limit sign and people are going to drive as fast as they feel comfortable,” Parker said. “They are only going to start mitigating their speed when they no longer feel comfortable.”

Each lane along north Denver is 20 feet wide. A typical lane is 10 feet wide. There are also no stop signs heading north and south on north Denver.

“If you aren’t seeing any friction in your travel space, then there really isn’t any reason to slow down,” Parker said.

Parker says the City is planning to come out and study the speeds and traffic along north Denver in the next few weeks.

Watch the Video Here

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *